© 2019 Western Kansas Child Advocacy Center

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Testimonial

"

 

"This was fun!

 

Can I come back

 

tomorrow?"

-Child victim's statement

after forensic interview

About



WKCAC provides child advocacy services in 33 rural western counties in Kansas using our state-of-the-art mobile units. Our Mobile Child Advocacy Center is the first mobile unit accredited in the nation.

 

Board of Directors

Wade Dixon - President

Diane Gentry - Vice President

Brandon Mumgaard - Treasurer

Stephanie Frohlich - Secretary

Jan Huck

Emily Strange

Callie Dyer 

Betty Greer

Linda Taylor

Front row (right to left) - Jan Huck (Scott City) Diane Gentry (Tribune) Emily Strange (Colby) 
Back row (right to left) - Christine Neeb (Garden City) Linda Taylor (Colby) Stephanie Frohlich (Scott City) Betty Greer (Deerfield) Brandon Mumgaard (Garden City) Callie Dyer (Garden City) Wade Dixon (Tribune)

Frequently

Asked

Questions

What is a CAC?

The Child Advocacy Center (CAC) is a safe, child-friendly setting for children to talk with caring adults. We begin with a forensic interview and facilitate the multi-disciplinary team (MDT) case review process to ensure children and their non-offending family members or guardians are referred to appropriate services.  Some children return to the CAC for therapy services when needed. 

 

Does a referral to the CAC mean that my child was abused?

Not necessarily.  When allegations of abuse are made, the MDT has the mandate to investigate these allegations thoroughly.  Sometimes these allegations are substantiated, and other times they are not.    Interviews are done in a manner that is neutral and is not done to “prove” abuse occurred.  A forensic interview is only one piece of an entire investigation.  It is likely that there will be other sources of information considered and reviewed to ensure the safety of your child.    

 

What happens during the interview?

Your child will be interviewed in a child-friendly room with a specially trained forensic interviewer. The interviewer asks neutral, fact-finding questions in a developmentally and culturally appropriate manner. The interview will be videotaped to make an accurate record of this encounter, this may also help reduce the need for repeat interviews.

 

Should I prepare my child for this interview?

Children are most comfortable when they know what to expect. Explain to your child that he or she will be meeting with a person whose job is to talk with children. You should NOT tell your child what to say. Please be mindful of conversations you have with others around your child as it could influence the information he/she shares during his/her interview.  Reassure your child that he or she is not in trouble and that it is ok to talk to the interviewer and that it is important, to tell the truth. 

May I stay with my child during the interview?

The interviewer must talk with your child alone. It is difficult for children to talk about the abuse they may have experienced and difficult for parents to hear. Having a parent in the room may distract or inhibit children during the interview. Children may also want the parent to answer questions for them. It is best if the child can provide information independently. 

 

What will happen after the interview?

The Law Enforcement assigned to the case and/or the Department for Children and Families (DCF) investigator may want to talk with you before and/or after the interview. At this time, they may be able to tell you what may happen next regarding the investigation.  This may also be a good time for you to share information and your concerns.

 

May I bring a friend or family member to wait with me?

You are more than welcome to bring a support person with you to the CAC.  You will also have an advocate assigned to you and your child. However, you should not bring the person being accused of maltreatment.

 

What is the advantage of having my child interviewed at the CAC?

Your child is our top priority. The CAC provides a place that is friendly, private and safe for children to talk.  The forensic interview and the MDT approach reduce the trauma your child may experience by limiting the number of times his/her story is told. Services for your family will be better coordinated, and you will have the opportunity to meet and ask questions of the people working on your child’s case.

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